The Adventures of Quintus the Pantsless Roman
did-you-kno:

Source

So…She’s basically a real Wildling princess?

did-you-kno:

Source

So…She’s basically a real Wildling princess?

filledelogique:

Dear TUmblr,

I made some bad life choices toinight. I’m sorry.

Love,

Fille de Logique

But I still love you.

~Q

drtanner:

iamtonysexual:

thegestianpoet:

confusedtree:

There are people in the world who don’t think Waluigi is the best Mario character and that he doesn’t deserve his own game
Isn’t that astounding

is he telling an entire stadium to suck his weewee

his
waluweewee

Reblogging again for fucking waluweewee are you fucking serious

This was definitely my favorite Mario game. The cut screens after scoring a goal were the best.

drtanner:

iamtonysexual:

thegestianpoet:

confusedtree:

There are people in the world who don’t think Waluigi is the best Mario character and that he doesn’t deserve his own game

Isn’t that astounding

is he telling an entire stadium to suck his weewee

his

waluweewee

Reblogging again for fucking waluweewee are you fucking serious

This was definitely my favorite Mario game. The cut screens after scoring a goal were the best.

tastefullyoffensive:

[theodd1sout]

The truth…*sob*

tobreakandblossom:

tobreakandblossom:

aerogare:

wnyc:

This week we got our first glimpse of the one pice of art that was commissioned for the 9/11 Museum:
http://wnyc.org/2C898

If there is one thing I love about the use of this quote, is that those who know the actual context of it (from the Aeneid) realize that it has an incredibly potent double meaning. From The New York Times (emphasis added):

It sounds fitting — except in the context of Book 9 of the “Aeneid,” from which it is translated. There, a reader learns who “you” are.
“You” are not nameless. You are Nisus and Euryalus.
“You” do not number in the thousands. You are two.
“You” are not civilians. You are Trojan soldiers.
“You” have not been thrown together by cruel chance. You are a loving pair.
Clearly, “you” does not fit the profile of Sept. 11 victims.
“If we take into account its original context, the quotation is more applicable to the aggressors in the 9/11 tragedy than to those honored by the memorial,” said Helen Morales, a classics professor at the University of California at Santa Barbara. “So my first reaction is that the quotation is shockingly inappropriate for the U.S. victims of the 9/11 attack.”
But Dr. Morales added that by invoking the two warriors, the quotation might also productively encourage some visitors to “wonder, as might Virgil’s readers have wondered of Nisus and Euryalus, what drives young men to commit such atrocities.”


I think another interesting thing about the use of this line is that, in its original context, it’s part of one of the only passages in the poem where the authorial voice speaks as such and addresses an explicitly contemporary audience, saying that the memory of these two men will endure, ‘if my songs have any power’, for as long as Augustan Rome stands (as the article points out). I think there are two implications that stand out here. Firstly, that America’s founding is bound up with political use of the Aeneid - whether in a ‘positive’, colonialist, justificatory way (e.g. the use of Virgilian phrases on dollar bills!) or a ‘pessimistic’ anti-imperialist way (this interpretation of the poem is associated with post-Vietnam disillusionment with the imperialist project). Here we again see the former - the implication that the victims of 9/11 will not be forgotten as long as the US stands associates the latter with Augustan Rome, and two millennia of deeply violent and bigoted classicising. The other implication, somewhat unsettling for the first, regards the transience of the material city. Augustan Rome no longer stands. Indeed, a troubling theme in the Aeneid is the destruction or future destruction of cities: Troy, obviously; half-built Carthage anticipating its destruction after the Punic Wars, the cause for which the Aeneid gives as Dido’s and Aeneas’ disastrous entanglement; various encampments and Italian settlements; and the future site of Rome, which is described as already the site of a ruined ancient city of the gods. Virgil mentions ‘cows roaming in the Forum’, in an incredible temporal double vision that finds fulfilment, in fact, when the ruined Forum was used as pasture in the Middle Ages. Cities and empires fall - a resonant motif in the site of Ground Zero, to say the least. Tying the memory of the victims to the materiality of the memorial would seem a risky business, for all that the Aeneid and its memorial to Nisus and Euryalus DID survive the fall of Augustus’ Rome.

Reblogging myself to add: The article mentions that the inscription originally gave its source as not just “Virgil” but “Virgil, Aeneid”, and that the citation of the specific work was removed after criticism of the choice of quotation, presumably to obscure the quote’s ambiguous original context. I think that’s an interesting choice. As it stands now, divorced from narrative context, it’s presented as some kind of eternal truth, verified over a proverb or folk motto by (i) its origin in classical antiquity, (ii) its status as ‘high literature’, (iii) its presentation as an inscription in stone, in huge archaizing quasi-Roman script, perhaps giving the appearance of some ancient monument that has stood and will stand for ever, a relic in material form as well as content of Virgil’s Rome. 
There’s also the lack of attribution to a translator, which jennystudiestranslation was talking about recently. (Unless there’s a plaque on another wall or something, I can’t see an obvious attribution, nor do either of the articles I’ve read on this inscription mention the translator; google books isn’t helping; most mentions have ‘here rendered’ or ‘translated from the Latin’.) Along with the lack of specific citation of the Aeneid, this also contributes to the ‘eternalizing’ sort of movement: it’s an eternal truth, obvious and appropriate, and as such translates perfectly from Latin to English, with the original Latin’s context and language-specific resonances or meaning either nonexistent or carried over the English. No translator was used, none required. The thing is, the sentiment  it looks like they were going for would have been just as effectively invoked by an English translation, or even these very words not attributed to Virgil: such a short phrase and common sentiment could easily be an original production, not a translation from a book finished in 19BC. The decision to elide the translator’s hand, retain the attribution to ‘Virgil’, but remove the troubling citation of the Aeneid, is very telling with regard to the validating use to which classical antiquity is put.
(Ok, I promise that’s all. Can you tell I’m procrastinating my own work? Virgilians get so excited about Virgil in contemporary culture: look, my degree is “”“relevant”“”!)

Okay, so I just officially got my degree in this stuff yesterday, so I feel compelled to say something. Two things come to mind:
1) This is a quote, like many quotes (especially Classical ones), that is taken out of context, and is supposed to be out of context. When you hear “Carpe Diem” (Seize the Day), you don’t want that contextualized. The context, while exciting for us few, is boring to the majority of people. Nonetheless it’s a nice quote that reminds us to take advantage of opportunities and live in the present moment. The same with this quote. It states something that Americans want to believe, i.e. that all the victims of 9/11 will not be forgotten, and America will continue to remember their deaths and the tragedy of the attack.
2) As for the context, Nisus and Euryalus were on a mission after an attack on the Trojan camp. They were essentially doing what Odysseus and Diomedes did on their night raid in the Iliad, except Nisus and Euryalus were significantly more inexperienced, and died because they got caught overloaded with prizes. However, this moves the Trojans to attack the Latins with greater force and greater passion. There are three ‘themes’ one could derive from this episode: 1) love between comrades 2) inexperience in war 3) increased passion and vigor from tragedy. The story in context then of 9/11 makes some sense. Loved ones were lost, but there were also acts of love, especially between firefighters, during the rescue attempts. Terrorism was a ‘new’ form of war for America since it had never occurred on American soil in such a large and devastating scale. And finally, the passion that resulted led America to war, not against the group of aggressors, but the idea of “Terrorism” itself. Thus, given this perspective, I think it’s a reasonable quote because the story reflects certain parallels with the events of 9/11
That’s all I got. 

tobreakandblossom:

tobreakandblossom:

aerogare:

wnyc:

This week we got our first glimpse of the one pice of art that was commissioned for the 9/11 Museum:

http://wnyc.org/2C898

If there is one thing I love about the use of this quote, is that those who know the actual context of it (from the Aeneid) realize that it has an incredibly potent double meaning. From The New York Times (emphasis added):

It sounds fitting — except in the context of Book 9 of the “Aeneid,” from which it is translated. There, a reader learns who “you” are.

“You” are not nameless. You are Nisus and Euryalus.

“You” do not number in the thousands. You are two.

“You” are not civilians. You are Trojan soldiers.

“You” have not been thrown together by cruel chance. You are a loving pair.

Clearly, “you” does not fit the profile of Sept. 11 victims.

“If we take into account its original context, the quotation is more applicable to the aggressors in the 9/11 tragedy than to those honored by the memorial,” said Helen Morales, a classics professor at the University of California at Santa Barbara. “So my first reaction is that the quotation is shockingly inappropriate for the U.S. victims of the 9/11 attack.”

But Dr. Morales added that by invoking the two warriors, the quotation might also productively encourage some visitors to “wonder, as might Virgil’s readers have wondered of Nisus and Euryalus, what drives young men to commit such atrocities.”

I think another interesting thing about the use of this line is that, in its original context, it’s part of one of the only passages in the poem where the authorial voice speaks as such and addresses an explicitly contemporary audience, saying that the memory of these two men will endure, ‘if my songs have any power’, for as long as Augustan Rome stands (as the article points out). I think there are two implications that stand out here. Firstly, that America’s founding is bound up with political use of the Aeneid - whether in a ‘positive’, colonialist, justificatory way (e.g. the use of Virgilian phrases on dollar bills!) or a ‘pessimistic’ anti-imperialist way (this interpretation of the poem is associated with post-Vietnam disillusionment with the imperialist project). Here we again see the former - the implication that the victims of 9/11 will not be forgotten as long as the US stands associates the latter with Augustan Rome, and two millennia of deeply violent and bigoted classicising. The other implication, somewhat unsettling for the first, regards the transience of the material city. Augustan Rome no longer stands. Indeed, a troubling theme in the Aeneid is the destruction or future destruction of cities: Troy, obviously; half-built Carthage anticipating its destruction after the Punic Wars, the cause for which the Aeneid gives as Dido’s and Aeneas’ disastrous entanglement; various encampments and Italian settlements; and the future site of Rome, which is described as already the site of a ruined ancient city of the gods. Virgil mentions ‘cows roaming in the Forum’, in an incredible temporal double vision that finds fulfilment, in fact, when the ruined Forum was used as pasture in the Middle Ages. Cities and empires fall - a resonant motif in the site of Ground Zero, to say the least. Tying the memory of the victims to the materiality of the memorial would seem a risky business, for all that the Aeneid and its memorial to Nisus and Euryalus DID survive the fall of Augustus’ Rome.

Reblogging myself to add: The article mentions that the inscription originally gave its source as not just “Virgil” but “Virgil, Aeneid”, and that the citation of the specific work was removed after criticism of the choice of quotation, presumably to obscure the quote’s ambiguous original context. I think that’s an interesting choice. As it stands now, divorced from narrative context, it’s presented as some kind of eternal truth, verified over a proverb or folk motto by (i) its origin in classical antiquity, (ii) its status as ‘high literature’, (iii) its presentation as an inscription in stone, in huge archaizing quasi-Roman script, perhaps giving the appearance of some ancient monument that has stood and will stand for ever, a relic in material form as well as content of Virgil’s Rome. 

There’s also the lack of attribution to a translator, which jennystudiestranslation was talking about recently. (Unless there’s a plaque on another wall or something, I can’t see an obvious attribution, nor do either of the articles I’ve read on this inscription mention the translator; google books isn’t helping; most mentions have ‘here rendered’ or ‘translated from the Latin’.) Along with the lack of specific citation of the Aeneid, this also contributes to the ‘eternalizing’ sort of movement: it’s an eternal truth, obvious and appropriate, and as such translates perfectly from Latin to English, with the original Latin’s context and language-specific resonances or meaning either nonexistent or carried over the English. No translator was used, none required. The thing is, the sentiment  it looks like they were going for would have been just as effectively invoked by an English translation, or even these very words not attributed to Virgil: such a short phrase and common sentiment could easily be an original production, not a translation from a book finished in 19BC. The decision to elide the translator’s hand, retain the attribution to ‘Virgil’, but remove the troubling citation of the Aeneid, is very telling with regard to the validating use to which classical antiquity is put.

(Ok, I promise that’s all. Can you tell I’m procrastinating my own work? Virgilians get so excited about Virgil in contemporary culture: look, my degree is “”“relevant”“”!)

Okay, so I just officially got my degree in this stuff yesterday, so I feel compelled to say something. Two things come to mind:

1) This is a quote, like many quotes (especially Classical ones), that is taken out of context, and is supposed to be out of context. When you hear “Carpe Diem” (Seize the Day), you don’t want that contextualized. The context, while exciting for us few, is boring to the majority of people. Nonetheless it’s a nice quote that reminds us to take advantage of opportunities and live in the present moment. The same with this quote. It states something that Americans want to believe, i.e. that all the victims of 9/11 will not be forgotten, and America will continue to remember their deaths and the tragedy of the attack.

2) As for the context, Nisus and Euryalus were on a mission after an attack on the Trojan camp. They were essentially doing what Odysseus and Diomedes did on their night raid in the Iliad, except Nisus and Euryalus were significantly more inexperienced, and died because they got caught overloaded with prizes. However, this moves the Trojans to attack the Latins with greater force and greater passion. There are three ‘themes’ one could derive from this episode: 1) love between comrades 2) inexperience in war 3) increased passion and vigor from tragedy. The story in context then of 9/11 makes some sense. Loved ones were lost, but there were also acts of love, especially between firefighters, during the rescue attempts. Terrorism was a ‘new’ form of war for America since it had never occurred on American soil in such a large and devastating scale. And finally, the passion that resulted led America to war, not against the group of aggressors, but the idea of “Terrorism” itself. Thus, given this perspective, I think it’s a reasonable quote because the story reflects certain parallels with the events of 9/11

That’s all I got. 

tastepurple:

highlights from the TSM Gleeb AMA

Gotta love Dyrone 

flatluigi:

evy-says-she:

lalondes:

HOMESTAR RUNNER: A BEGINNER’S GUIDE
The year is 2003. It is a kinder time, a simpler time.
Every single one of your classmates knows how to draw Trogdor the Burninator - first, you draw an S, then you draw a more different S.
"Everybody to the Limit" is a staple at middle school dances.
Your best friend’s little brother owns a plush The Cheat, and you can kick it, and it makes noise.
The year is 2003, the golden age of Homestar Runner.
Basically, every online content creator, every webcomic artist, every YouTube entertainer, owes Homestar Runner a shitload. 
Once upon a time, Homestar Runner was the definitive Flash site, an online destination for kids and immature grown-ups alike, fielding millions of hits and thousands of e-mails a day. 
Homestar Runner, the earnest athlete with a pure heart and a love for mankind, and his arch-nemesis, Strong Bad, a wrestler with a penchant for issuing snarky responses to fanmail, defined a generation through weird, surrealist Flash cartoons tinged with outdated pop cultural references.
Ten years later, there’s a new generation of Internetters who have never experienced the pure, unadulterated joy of H-Star-R, and that breaks my heart. 
So, here, I’ve compiled this beginner’s guide to Homestar Runner. Every cartoon on this list is shorter than five minutes. Get into it. Do yourself a favour.
STEP ONE: STRONG BAD E-MAILS
dragon
techno
comic
japanese cartoon
caper
stunt double
kids’ book
caffeine
army
different town
crying
for kids
montage
bedtime story
hygiene
STEP TWO: TEEN GIRL SQUAD
Episodes #1-15 are available here. Watch them all.
STEP THREE: SHORTS
An Important Rap Song
Where My Hat Is At?
Best Caper Ever
Play Date
The Homestar Runner Gets Something Stuck In His Craw
One Two, One Two
Fluffy Puff Commercial
STEP FOUR: TOONS
A Jorb Well Done
Cool Things
Date Nite
DNA Evidence
A Folky Tale

This was my childhood right here.

homestar runner is the best and very important and still holds up a fucking ton

Ah yes, I remember watching these over at my friend’s house when I was in grade school

flatluigi:

evy-says-she:

lalondes:

HOMESTAR RUNNER: A BEGINNER’S GUIDE

The year is 2003. It is a kinder time, a simpler time.

Every single one of your classmates knows how to draw Trogdor the Burninator - first, you draw an S, then you draw a more different S.

"Everybody to the Limit" is a staple at middle school dances.

Your best friend’s little brother owns a plush The Cheat, and you can kick it, and it makes noise.

The year is 2003, the golden age of Homestar Runner.

Basically, every online content creator, every webcomic artist, every YouTube entertainer, owes Homestar Runner a shitload.

Once upon a time, Homestar Runner was the definitive Flash site, an online destination for kids and immature grown-ups alike, fielding millions of hits and thousands of e-mails a day.

Homestar Runner, the earnest athlete with a pure heart and a love for mankind, and his arch-nemesis, Strong Bad, a wrestler with a penchant for issuing snarky responses to fanmail, defined a generation through weird, surrealist Flash cartoons tinged with outdated pop cultural references.

Ten years later, there’s a new generation of Internetters who have never experienced the pure, unadulterated joy of H-Star-R, and that breaks my heart. 

So, here, I’ve compiled this beginner’s guide to Homestar Runner. Every cartoon on this list is shorter than five minutes. Get into it. Do yourself a favour.

STEP ONE: STRONG BAD E-MAILS

  1. dragon
  2. techno
  3. comic
  4. japanese cartoon
  5. caper
  6. stunt double
  7. kids’ book
  8. caffeine
  9. army
  10. different town
  11. crying
  12. for kids
  13. montage
  14. bedtime story
  15. hygiene

STEP TWO: TEEN GIRL SQUAD

Episodes #1-15 are available here. Watch them all.

STEP THREE: SHORTS

  1. An Important Rap Song
  2. Where My Hat Is At?
  3. Best Caper Ever
  4. Play Date
  5. The Homestar Runner Gets Something Stuck In His Craw
  6. One Two, One Two
  7. Fluffy Puff Commercial

STEP FOUR: TOONS

  1. A Jorb Well Done
  2. Cool Things
  3. Date Nite
  4. DNA Evidence
  5. A Folky Tale

This was my childhood right here.

homestar runner is the best and very important and still holds up a fucking ton

Ah yes, I remember watching these over at my friend’s house when I was in grade school

Basically my entire childhood and young adulthood is being considered non canon…

I fucking love Star Wars, and the best part was the EU, which, according to this, is now effectively being rewritten. It’s like being told everything I once believed is now a lie.

alliartist:

music-holic:

And the Waltz Goes On - Anthony Hopkins 

Sir Anthony Hopkins Hears The Waltz He Wrote 50 Years Ago For The First Time

Academy Award-winning actor Sir Anthony Hopkins was a musician before he got into acting. 50 years ago he wrote a waltz but was too afraid to ever hear it play. Dutch violinist André Rieu performs it for the very first time. Watch Hopkins’ reaction.

That was beautiful

caerulea-divilu:

did-someone-say-pool:

the-time-lord-of-the-rings:

Mama Fury on waking up the Avengers.

(Source: Imgur)

LOKI IS FUCKGN DUCT TAPED TO THE BED I SIMPLY CANNOT

I don’t think there will ever come a time when I won’t reblog this.